Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
International Journal of Rotating Machinery
Volume 7, Issue 1, Pages 21-40
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/S1023621X01000033

Recent Development in Turbine Blade Film Cooling

1Turbine Heat Transfer Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Department, Texas A&M University, College Station 77843-3123, TX, USA
2Mechanical Engineering Department, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge 70803, LA, USA

Revised 10 March 1999

Copyright © 2001 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Gas turbines are extensively used for aircraft propulsion, land-based power generation, and industrial applications. Thermal efficiency and power output of gas turbines increase with increasing turbine rotor inlet temperature (RIT). The current RIT level in advanced gas turbines is far above the .melting point of the blade material. Therefore, along with high temperature material development, a sophisticated cooling scheme must be developed for continuous safe operation of gas turbines with high performance. Gas turbine blades are cooled internally and externally. This paper focuses on external blade cooling or so-called film cooling. In film cooling, relatively cool air is injected from the inside of the blade to the outside surface which forms a protective layer between the blade surface and hot gas streams. Performance of film cooling primarily depends on the coolant to mainstream pressure ratio, temperature ratio, and film hole location and geometry under representative engine flow conditions. In the past number of years there has been considerable progress in turbine film cooling research and this paper is limited to review a few selected publications to reflect recent development in turbine blade film cooling.