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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 407074, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/407074
Review Article

Practice-Oriented Retest Learning as the Basic Form of Cognitive Plasticity of the Aging Brain

Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, JOR823A, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3

Received 13 April 2011; Revised 23 August 2011; Accepted 24 August 2011

Academic Editor: Leonardo Pantoni

Copyright © 2011 Lixia Yang. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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