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Journal of Cancer Epidemiology
Volume 2012, Article ID 309109, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/309109
Research Article

Increasing Public Awareness of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Health Care Access, Internet Use, and Population Density Correlates

1Clinical Monitoring Research Program, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., NCI, Frederick, MD 21702, USA
2Division of Health Policy and Management, University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware Street SE, MMC 729, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
3Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Boulvard, MSC 7326, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA

Received 19 April 2012; Revised 19 June 2012; Accepted 19 June 2012

Academic Editor: Angela Bryan

Copyright © 2012 Lila J. Finney Rutten et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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