Table of Contents
Journal of Food Processing
Volume 2014, Article ID 603639, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/603639
Research Article

Effect of Processing Conditions on Calcium Content, Firmness, and Color of Papaya in Syrup

1CIDCA, CCT LA Plata CONICET, FCE, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, B1900AAJ La Plata, Argentina
2FCEQyN, Universidad Nacional de Misiones, AR-N3300LQH Posadas, Argentina
3Departamento de Ingeniería Química, FI, UNLP, B1900AAJ La Plata, Argentina

Received 18 December 2013; Revised 23 May 2014; Accepted 26 May 2014; Published 16 June 2014

Academic Editor: Kit Keith L. Yam

Copyright © 2014 Nancy Lovera et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Calcium impregnation is used as a pretreatment in the processing of papaya in syrup. The effect of process temperature (30 and 45°C), calcium source (calcium gluconate and calcium lactate), calcium concentration (0.5 and 1.5% w/w), and pH (4.2 and 6) were studied. The mineral source affected significantly the calcium uptake and the fruit firmness, and therefore, the product quality maximum content of calcium in the fruit was 240 and 72 mg/100 g fresh fruit in 8 h of treatment with calcium lactate and calcium gluconate, respectively. Greater firmness was observed in samples impregnated with calcium lactate. Impregnation treatments did not affect the surface color of fruit. Finally, the effect of cooking in sucrose syrup on product quality attributes (calcium retention, firmness, and color) was analyzed. Cooking in syrup had a positive effect on tissue firmness, despite the decrease of calcium content. During cooking in syrup, calcium content of treated fruit decreased between 9% and 37%. However, the calcium content of fruit in syrup was up to 6 times higher than in fresh fruit. Moreover, the cooking stage had a strong influence on color parameters, leading to a processed product darker than fresh fruit.