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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 124187, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/124187
Review Article

Towards Curative Cancer Immunotherapy: Overcoming Posttherapy Tumor Escape

1Cancer Immunotherapy Program, Cancer Center, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
2Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
3Cancer Immunology Experimental Medicine, Hoffmann-La Roche Inc., Nutley, NJ, USA
4Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA

Received 30 January 2012; Accepted 6 March 2012

Academic Editor: Nejat Egilmez

Copyright © 2012 Gang Zhou and Hyam Levitsky. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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