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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 163453, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/163453
Review Article

Mechanisms behind Functional Avidity Maturation in T Cells

Department of International Health, Immunology and Microbiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark

Received 15 October 2011; Accepted 26 January 2012

Academic Editor: Niels Olsen Saraiva Camara

Copyright © 2012 Marina Rode von Essen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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