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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 238924, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/238924
Research Article

Improved Activation toward Primary Colorectal Cancer Cells by Antigen-Specific Targeting Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells

1Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bonn, 53127 Bonn, Germany
2Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne and Department I of Internal Medicine, University of Cologne, 53901 Cologne, Germany
3Center for Integrated Oncology Cologne-Bonn, Germany
4Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn, Germany

Received 2 September 2011; Revised 3 November 2011; Accepted 17 November 2011

Academic Editor: Ana Lepique

Copyright © 2012 Claudia Schlimper et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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