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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 429675, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/429675
Research Article

Complement Factor C7 Contributes to Lung Immunopathology Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2Department of Pediatrics-Renal Section, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Received 11 May 2012; Accepted 20 July 2012

Academic Editor: Daniel Rittirsch

Copyright © 2012 Kerry J. Welsh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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