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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 490148, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/490148
Review Article

CD154: An Immunoinflammatory Mediator in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Rheumatoid Arthritis

1Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 11-5076, St Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon
2Laboratoire d'Immunologie Cellulaire et Moléculaire, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Hôpital St-Luc, Montréal, QC, Canada H2X 1P1

Received 16 June 2011; Accepted 17 August 2011

Academic Editor: Ludvig A. Munthe

Copyright © 2012 Nada Alaaeddine et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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