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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 678705, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/678705
Review Article

HEB in the Spotlight: Transcriptional Regulation of T-Cell Specification, Commitment, and Developmental Plasticity

Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M4N 3M5

Received 16 October 2011; Accepted 12 December 2011

Academic Editor: Alexandre S. Basso

Copyright © 2012 Marsela Braunstein and Michele K. Anderson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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