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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 309302, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/309302
Review Article

Sphingolipids and Brain Resident Macrophages in Neuroinflammation: An Emerging Aspect of Nervous System Pathology

1Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, CNR Institute of Neuroscience, “Luigi Sacco” University Hospital, University of Milan, 20157 Milan, Italy
2E. Medea Scientific Institute, 23842 Bosisio Parini, Italy
3Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-Food and Forest Systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, 01100 Viterbo, Italy

Received 23 May 2013; Accepted 1 August 2013

Academic Editor: Daniel Larocque

Copyright © 2013 Emma Assi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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