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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 325318, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/325318
Review Article

Chemokines in Chronic Liver Allograft Dysfunction Pathogenesis and Potential Therapeutic Targets

1Department of General Surgery, General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300052, China
2Department of Anesthesiology, General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300052, China
3Department of General Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China

Received 4 August 2013; Accepted 3 October 2013

Academic Editor: Basak Kayhan

Copyright © 2013 Bin Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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