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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013, Article ID 542091, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/542091
Review Article

Potential of Immunoglobulin A to Prevent Allergic Asthma

1Department of Pulmonology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
2Leiden Immunoparasitology Group, Department of Parasitology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, P4-37A, 2333 ZA Leiden, The Netherlands
3Laboratory of Immunoregulation and Mucosal Immunology, Department of Molecular Biomedical Research, VIB, Technologiepark 927, 9052 Ghent, Belgium

Received 31 January 2013; Revised 15 March 2013; Accepted 16 March 2013

Academic Editor: Mohamad Mohty

Copyright © 2013 Anouk K. Gloudemans et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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