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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013, Article ID 542152, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/542152
Review Article

Mucins Help to Avoid Alloreactivity at the Maternal Fetal Interface

1Department of Physiology and Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Rijeka, B. Branchetta 20, 51000 Rijeka, Croatia
2Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Clinical Hospital Rijeka, Kresimirova 42, 51000 Rijeka, Croatia
3Division of Cardiology, Hospital for Medical Rehabilitation of the Heart and Lung Diseases and Rheumatism “Thalassotherapia”, M. Tita 188, 51410 Opatija, Croatia
4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Clinical Hospital, University of Rijeka, Kresimirova 42a, 51000 Rijeka, Croatia

Received 10 April 2013; Accepted 28 May 2013

Academic Editor: Stanislav Vukmanovic

Copyright © 2013 Arnela Redzovic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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