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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013, Article ID 623812, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/623812
Review Article

Indoor Volatile Organic Compounds and Chemical Sensitivity Reactions

1Center for Environmental Health Sciences, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506, Japan
2Center for Environmental Risk Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506, Japan
3University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 807-8555, Japan
4Department of Environmental Health, National Institute of Public Health, 2-3-6 Minami, Wako City, Saitama 351-0197, Japan

Received 28 April 2013; Accepted 17 September 2013

Academic Editor: Carlos Barcia

Copyright © 2013 Tin-Tin Win-Shwe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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