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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 689827, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/689827
Review Article

Regulatory T Cell in Stroke: A New Paradigm for Immune Regulation

1Department of Neurosurgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310009, China
2Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92350, USA

Received 30 April 2013; Accepted 4 July 2013

Academic Editor: Carlos Barcia

Copyright © 2013 Sheng Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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