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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 986859, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/986859
Research Article

Glucocorticoid-Induced TNFR-Related Protein Stimulation Reverses Cardiac Allograft Acceptance Induced by CD40-CD40L Blockade

1Program in Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Michigan, Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA
3Section of Transplantation Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
4Graduate Program in Immunology, University of Michigan, Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA

Received 1 February 2013; Accepted 14 March 2013

Academic Editor: Stanislav Vukmanovic

Copyright © 2013 Kenneth T. Krill et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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