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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 237043, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/237043
Review Article

The Impact of “Omic” and Imaging Technologies on Assessing the Host Immune Response to Biodefence Agents

1Biodefence and PreClinical Evaluation Group, Public Health England (PHE), Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire, SP5 3NU, UK
2Biomedical Sciences Department, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl), Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire, SP4 0JQ, UK

Received 15 April 2014; Revised 23 July 2014; Accepted 5 August 2014; Published 16 September 2014

Academic Editor: Louise Pitt

Copyright © 2014. British Crown Copyright. Published with the permission of the controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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