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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 143526, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/143526
Review Article

The Impact of Immune System in Regulating Bone Metastasis Formation by Osteotropic Tumors

1Department of Orthopedics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA
2CeRMS, San Giovanni Battista General Hospital, University of Turin, Via Santena 5, 10126 Turin, Italy

Received 13 October 2014; Accepted 2 December 2014

Academic Editor: Roberta Faccio

Copyright © 2015 Lucia D’Amico and Ilaria Roato. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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