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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 192415, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/192415
Review Article

Recognition of Immune Response for the Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Osteoarthritis

1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
2Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA

Received 17 October 2014; Accepted 2 December 2014

Academic Editor: Patrizia D’Amelio

Copyright © 2015 Adrese M. Kandahari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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