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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 839684, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/839684
Research Article

Chemokine Receptor Expression on Normal Blood CD56+ NK-Cells Elucidates Cell Partners That Comigrate during the Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses and Identifies a Transitional NK-Cell Population

1Laboratory of Cytometry, Service of Hematology, Hospital de Santo António (HSA), Centro Hospitalar do Porto (CHP), Rua D. Manuel II, 4050-345 Porto, Portugal
2Laboratory of Flow Cytometry, Centro de Investigación del Cancer (CIC), Campus Miguel de Unamuno, 37007 Salamanca, Spain

Received 24 December 2014; Revised 2 March 2015; Accepted 2 March 2015

Academic Editor: Manoj K. Mishra

Copyright © 2015 Margarida Lima et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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