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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 931574, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/931574
Review Article

Intestinal Microbiota as Modulators of the Immune System and Neuroimmune System: Impact on the Host Health and Homeostasis

1Department of Biology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, 36036-900 Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil
2Department of Pharmacy, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Governador Valadares, Brazil
3Department of Immunology, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
4Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Governador Valadares, Brazil
5Department of Clinical Dentistry, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil
6Department of Parasitology, Microbiology and Immunology, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil
7Department of Dentistry, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Governador Valadares, Brazil

Received 18 July 2014; Revised 6 November 2014; Accepted 7 November 2014

Academic Editor: Miguel Gueimonde

Copyright © 2015 Carlos Magno da Costa Maranduba et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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