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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 968212, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/968212
Review Article

Clinical Options in Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma: An Updated Review

1Hematology and Stem Cell Transplant Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera BMM, 89100 Reggio Calabria, Italy
2Biotechnology Research Unit, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale di Cosenza, 87051 Aprigliano, Italy
3Hematology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera di Cosenza, 87100 Cosenza, Italy

Received 18 July 2015; Accepted 22 October 2015

Academic Editor: Daniel Olive

Copyright © 2015 Roberta Fedele et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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