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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 1958650, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1958650
Review Article

Molecular Mechanisms of Induction of Tolerant and Tolerogenic Intestinal Dendritic Cells in Mice

University of Tübingen, Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, Elfriede-Aulhorn-Strasse 6, 72076 Tübingen, Germany

Received 22 October 2015; Revised 6 January 2016; Accepted 17 January 2016

Academic Editor: Silvia Beatriz Boscardin

Copyright © 2016 Alex Steimle and Julia-Stefanie Frick. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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