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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 3967436, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3967436
Review Article

Dendritic Cells and Leishmania Infection: Adding Layers of Complexity to a Complex Disease

1Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz (CPqGM), 40296-710 Salvador, BA, Brazil
2Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), 40170-115 Salvador, BA, Brazil
3Instituto de Investigação em Imunologia (iii), 01246-903 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 23 October 2015; Accepted 28 December 2015

Academic Editor: Alice O. Kamphorst

Copyright © 2016 Daniel Feijó et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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