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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 7979637, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7979637
Review Article

Inflammatory Cytokine Signaling during Development of Pancreatic and Prostate Cancers

Center for Cancer Research & Therapeutic Development and Department of Biological Sciences, Clark Atlanta University, 223 James P. Brawley Drive SW, Atlanta, GA 30314, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Geou-Yarh Liou; ude.uac@uoilg

Received 28 July 2017; Revised 31 October 2017; Accepted 8 November 2017; Published 12 December 2017

Academic Editor: Shi Jin

Copyright © 2017 Geou-Yarh Liou. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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