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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2018, Article ID 4928757, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/4928757
Research Article

Longitudinal Evaluation of Humoral Immunity and Bacterial and Clinical Parameters Reveals That Antigen-Specific Antibodies Suppress Inflammatory Responses in Active Tuberculosis Patients

1Department of Bacteriology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Abeno, Osaka 545-8585, Japan
2Division of Respiratory Medicine, Fukujuji Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association, Matsuyama, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8522, Japan
3Department of Mycobacteriology, Leprosy Research Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Aoba, Higashi-Murayama, Tokyo 189-0002, Japan
4Department of Bacteriology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medicine, Niigata 951-8510, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Yoshihiko Hoshino; pj.og.hin@onihsohy

Received 19 May 2017; Revised 6 November 2017; Accepted 31 December 2017; Published 4 July 2018

Academic Editor: Senthamil R. Selvan

Copyright © 2018 Mamiko Niki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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