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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2018, Article ID 5315816, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5315816
Review Article

New Insights in the Pathogenesis of HPV Infection and the Associated Carcinogenic Processes: The Role of Chronic Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

1“Victor Babes” Clinical Hospital for Infectious Diseases, 281 Mihai Bravu, 030303 Bucharest, Romania
2“Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 37 Dionisie Lupu, 020021 Bucharest, Romania
3“Prof. N. Paulescu” National Institute of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases, 22-24 Gr. Manolescu, Bucharest 011233, Romania
4“Wolfson Medical Center”, 61 Halochamim Street, 58100 Holon, Israel
5“Cantacuzino” National Medico-Military Institute for Research and Development, 103 Splaiul Independentei, 050096 Bucharest, Romania

Correspondence should be addressed to Cristina Iulia Mitran; moc.liamg@nartim.ailui.anitsirc

Received 13 July 2018; Accepted 8 August 2018; Published 27 August 2018

Academic Editor: Iulia D. Popescu

Copyright © 2018 Simona Roxana Georgescu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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