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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2018, Article ID 6827237, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6827237
Review Article

Roles of Macrophage Subtypes in Bowel Anastomotic Healing and Anastomotic Leakage

Gastrointestinal Cancer Center, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute, No. 52 Fu-Cheng Road, Hai-Dian District, Beijing 100142, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Ziyu Li; moc.kooltuo@yrogergil

Received 28 July 2017; Revised 21 December 2017; Accepted 2 January 2018; Published 18 February 2018

Academic Editor: Zissis Chroneos

Copyright © 2018 Jinyao Shi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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