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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2018, Article ID 8605471, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8605471
Review Article

Regulation of Immune Cell Functions by Metabolic Reprogramming

1Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon 21999, Republic of Korea
2Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Gachon Advanced Institute for Health Science and Technology, Gachon University, Incheon 21999, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Jaehong Kim; rk.ca.nohcag@scitereg

Received 19 October 2017; Accepted 14 January 2018; Published 13 February 2018

Academic Editor: Abdallah Elkhal

Copyright © 2018 Jaehong Kim. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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