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Journal of Nanomaterials
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 825363, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/825363
Research Article

Nanoconjugate Platforms Development Based in Poly( ,L-Malic Acid) Methyl Esters for Tumor Drug Delivery

1Department of Neurosurgery, Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8631 W. Third Street, Suite 800E, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA
2Departament d'Enginyeria Química, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, ETSEIB, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
3Institut für Biophysik und Physikalische Biochemie, Universität Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg, Germany

Received 29 October 2009; Accepted 21 January 2010

Academic Editor: Chao Lin

Copyright © 2010 José Portilla-Arias et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

New copolyesters derived from poly( ,L-malic acid) have been designed to serve as nanoconjugate platforms in drug delivery. 25% and 50% methylated derivatives (coPMLA-Me25H75 and coPMLA-Me50H50) with absolute molecular weights of 32 600 Da and 33 100 Da, hydrodynamic diameters of 3.0 nm and 5.2 nm and zeta potential of 15 mV and 8.25 mV, respectively, were found to destabilize membranes of liposomes at pH 5.0 and pH 7.5 at concentrations above 0.05 mg/mL. The copolymers were soluble in PBS (half life of 40 hours) and in human plasma (half life of 15 hours) but they showed tendency to aggregate at high levels of methylation. Fluorescence-labeled copolymers were internalized into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with increased efficiency for the higher methylated copolymer. Viability of cultured brain and breast cancer cell lines indicated moderate toxicity that increased with methylation. The conclusion of the present work is that partially methylated poly( ,L-malic acid) copolyesters are suitable as nanoconjugate platforms for drug delivery.