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Journal of Nanomaterials
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 523646, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/523646
Review Article

In Vivo Imaging of Nitric Oxide by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques

1Center for Nanomagnetics and Biotechnology, Tallahassee, FL 32310, USA
2Department of Ophthalmology, Hallym University Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Hwaseong 445-907, Republic of Korea
3Department of Biological Engineering, Inha University, 100 Inharo, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751, Republic of Korea

Received 23 June 2014; Accepted 28 June 2014; Published 17 July 2014

Academic Editor: Ki-Joon Jeon

Copyright © 2014 Rakesh Sharma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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