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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 821717, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/821717
Research Article

Loss of miR-200c: A Marker of Aggressiveness and Chemoresistance in Female Reproductive Cancers

Department of Pathology, Denver School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora CO, 80045, USA

Received 1 June 2009; Accepted 26 September 2009

Academic Editor: Phillip J. Buckhaults

Copyright © 2010 Dawn R. Cochrane et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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