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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2012, Article ID 735465, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/735465
Research Article

Unraveling the Relationship between Smoking and Weight: The Role of Sedentary Behavior

1Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, Office of the Associate Director, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20852, USA
2Tobacco Control Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20852, USA
3Health Behaviors Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20852, USA

Received 2 May 2011; Revised 1 July 2011; Accepted 5 July 2011

Academic Editor: Susan B. Sisson

Copyright © 2012 Annette Kaufman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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