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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2015, Article ID 414781, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/414781
Review Article

The Role of RPGR and Its Interacting Proteins in Ciliopathies

1Department of Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, UK
2Inverclyde Royal Hospital, Greenock PA16 0XN, UK

Received 26 December 2014; Revised 13 April 2015; Accepted 19 April 2015

Academic Editor: Hyeong Gon Yu

Copyright © 2015 Sarita Rani Patnaik et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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