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Journal of Sensors
Volume 2008, Article ID 797436, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/797436
Research Article

Monitoring of Enzymatic Proteolysis Using Self-Assembled Quantum Dot-Protein Substrate Sensors

1Division of Optical Sciences, Code 5611, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave, SW, Washington, DC 20375, USA
2Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
3Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Code 6900, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave, SW, Washington, DC 20375, USA
4Promega Biosciences, Inc., 277 Granada Dr., San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA
5Center for Biomedical Genomics, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA

Received 9 May 2008; Accepted 28 June 2008

Academic Editor: Francesco Baldini

Copyright © 2008 Aaron R. Clapp et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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