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Journal of Tropical Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 819512, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/819512
Review Article

Host Cell Signalling and Leishmania Mechanisms of Evasion

Centre for the Study of Host Resistance, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre and Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and Medicine, McGill University, Room 610, 3775 University Street, Duff Medical Building, Montréal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4

Received 9 June 2011; Accepted 16 August 2011

Academic Editor: Jose M. Requena

Copyright © 2012 Marina Tiemi Shio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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