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Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 426427, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/426427
Research Article

Maternal Thyroid Function during the Second Half of Pregnancy and Child Neurodevelopment at 6, 12, 24, and 60 Months of Age

Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health (CERCH), School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94704-7392, USA

Received 23 March 2011; Revised 26 June 2011; Accepted 7 July 2011

Academic Editor: Joanne Rovet

Copyright © 2011 Jonathan Chevrier et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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