Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 302537, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/302537
Review Article

The Role of Oxidative Stress on the Pathogenesis of Graves' Disease

1School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
2Clinic of Endocrinology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Dr Subotića 13, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia

Received 4 September 2011; Accepted 1 November 2011

Academic Editor: Leonidas H. Duntas

Copyright © 2012 Miloš Žarković. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Graves' disease is a most common cause of hyperthyroidism. It is an autoimmune disease, and autoimmune process induces an inflammatory reaction, and reactive oxygen species (ROSs) are among its products. When balance between oxidants and antioxidants is disturbed, in favour of the oxidants it is termed “oxidative stress” (OS). Increased OS characterizes Graves' disease. It seems that the level of OS is increased in subjects with Graves' ophthalmopathy compared to the other subjects with Graves' disease. Among the other factors, OS is involved in proliferation of orbital fibroblasts. Polymorphism of the 8-oxoG DNA N-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) involved in repair of the oxidative damaged DNA increases in the risk for developing Grave's disease. Treatment with glucocorticoids reduces levels of OS markers. A recent large clinical trial evaluated effect of selenium on mild Graves' ophthalmopathy. Selenium treatment was associated with an improved quality of life and less eye involvement and slowed the progression of Graves' orbitopathy, compared to placebo.