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Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2012, Article ID 724382, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/724382
Review Article

Microchimerism in Graves' Disease

Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, University Clinic of Navarra, University of Navarra, Pio XII 36, 31080 Pamplona, Spain

Received 31 October 2011; Accepted 16 January 2012

Academic Editor: Terry F. Davies

Copyright © 2012 Juan C. Galofré. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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