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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2010, Article ID 497987, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/497987
Review Article

Toll-Like Receptors Expression and Signaling in Glia Cells in Neuro-Amyloidogenic Diseases: Towards Future Therapeutic Application

Department of Neurobiology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Sherman building, Room 424, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel

Received 31 December 2009; Accepted 20 June 2010

Academic Editor: Philipp Lepper

Copyright © 2010 Dorit Trudler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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