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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2010, Article ID 976024, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/976024
Review Article

Pattern Recognition via the Toll-Like Receptor System in the Human Female Genital Tract

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Oita University, Oita 879-5593, Japan

Received 17 November 2009; Revised 10 January 2010; Accepted 15 February 2010

Academic Editor: Kathy Triantafilou

Copyright © 2010 Kaei Nasu and Hisashi Narahara. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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