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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2012, Article ID 478601, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/478601
Review Article

Lipid Bodies: Inflammatory Organelles Implicated in Host-Trypanosoma cruzi Interplay during Innate Immune Responses

1Laboratory of Cellular Biology, Department of Biology, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UF JF), 36036-900 Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil
2Program of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Oswaldo Cruz Institute (IOC/FIOCRUZ), 21040-360 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

Received 17 November 2011; Revised 8 February 2012; Accepted 14 February 2012

Academic Editor: Nicolas Flamand

Copyright © 2012 Heloisa D'Avila et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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