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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 568783, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/568783
Review Article

Macrophages, Inflammation, and Tumor Suppressors: ARF, a New Player in the Game

1Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory, The Salk Institute, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, San Diego, CA 92037, USA
2Instituto Nacional de Investigación Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA), Centro de Investigación en Sanidad Animal (CISA), Ctra. de Algete a El Casar s/n, Valdeolmos, 28130 Madrid, Spain
3Unidad de Inflamación y Cáncer, Área de Biología Celular y Desarrollo, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Carretera Majadahonda-Pozuelo, Km 2,200, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid, Spain

Received 3 September 2012; Accepted 7 November 2012

Academic Editor: Sung-Jen Wei

Copyright © 2012 Paqui G. Través et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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