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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 696897, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/696897
Review Article

Cyclooxygenase Inhibition in Sepsis: Is There Life after Death?

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate Program in Immunology, Reproductive Sciences Program, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA

Received 7 February 2012; Accepted 8 March 2012

Academic Editor: Lúcia Helena Faccioli

Copyright © 2012 David M. Aronoff. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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