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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 320519, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/320519
Review Article

Immune Privilege as an Intrinsic CNS Property: Astrocytes Protect the CNS against T-Cell-Mediated Neuroinflammation

1Institute of Behavioural Physiology, Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology, Wilhelm-Stahl-Allee 2, 18196 Dummerstorf, Germany
2Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, Cruciform Building, Gower Street, London WC1 6BT, UK
3Experimental Pediatrics, University Hospital, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Leipziger Straße 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany

Received 21 February 2013; Accepted 9 July 2013

Academic Editor: Jonathan P. Godbout

Copyright © 2013 Ulrike Gimsa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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