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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 146893, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/146893
Clinical Study

Inflammation and Growth in Young Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome before and after Adenotonsillectomy

1Department of Pediatrics, Soroka University Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University, 84101 Beer Sheva, Israel
2Department of Epidemiology, Soroka University Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University, 84101 Beer Sheva, Israel
3Sleep Wake Disorders Unit, Soroka University Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University, 84101 Beer Sheva, Israel

Received 2 June 2014; Revised 6 August 2014; Accepted 7 August 2014; Published 24 August 2014

Academic Editor: Leila Kheirandish-Gozal

Copyright © 2014 Yuval Nachalon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with growth impairment that usually improves following effective treatment. In this study we investigated the mechanisms underlying the growth processes in young children diagnosed with OSA, before and after adenotonsillectomy (T&A). Methods. Young children (6–36 months old) were enrolled and evaluated before and several months after T&A surgery for height, weight, circulating high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels. Caloric intake was assessed by a validated Short Food Frequency Questionnaire (SFFQ). Results. Following T&A, children added 4.81 cm and 1.88 kg to their height and weight, respectively ( for both) and had a significant increase in BMI Z score (). Increased caloric intake of 377 kcal/day was noted (), with increased protein and decreased fat intake. The decrease in CRP levels correlated with the increase in body weight in boys (, adjusted for caloric intake). Conclusions. Adenotonsillectomy results in enhanced somatic growth in young children that correlates with a decrease in systemic inflammation and caloric intake increment. Our findings imply that systemic inflammation may have an important role in this OSA-related morbidity.