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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 243713, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/243713
Review Article

Interferons and Interferon Regulatory Factors in Malaria

1Singapore Immunology Network, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore 138648
2Department of Microbiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119228

Received 19 April 2014; Accepted 18 June 2014; Published 15 July 2014

Academic Editor: José C. Rosa Neto

Copyright © 2014 Sin Yee Gun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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