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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 319215, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/319215
Review Article

Recognition Functions of Pentameric C-Reactive Protein in Cardiovascular Disease

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614, USA

Received 23 March 2014; Revised 7 May 2014; Accepted 7 May 2014; Published 19 May 2014

Academic Editor: Jan Torzewski

Copyright © 2014 Alok Agrawal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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