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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 480980, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/480980
Research Article

Subclinical Inflammatory Status in Rett Syndrome

1Child Neuropsychiatry Unit, University Hospital Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese (AOUS), Viale M. Bracci 16, 53100 Siena, Italy
2Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Via A. Moro 2, 53100 Siena, Italy
3Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital AOUS, Viale M. Bracci 16, 53100 Siena, Italy
4Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena, Via A. Moro 6, 53100 Siena, Italy
5Department of Life Science, University of Siena, Via A. Moro 2, 53100 Siena, Italy
6Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, Via Borsari 46, 44100 Ferrara, Italy
7Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, 1 Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea

Received 8 October 2013; Revised 4 December 2013; Accepted 6 December 2013; Published 6 January 2014

Academic Editor: Paul Ashwood

Copyright © 2014 Alessio Cortelazzo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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